Pine Needle Terpenes

Harvesting Pinene Terpenes

Pinene We had a very interesting inquiry recently about specific pine needles on some of the properties we manage. We have a stable up in Greer, Arizona that we co-manage with another couple and there is an abundance of pine in the area. The email we received was about a specific type of pine, and the emailing party inquired about making a trip out from California to walk the property and inspect the pine. After a few emails were exchanged they followed up with a phone call. Initially, I didn’t understand the nature of the call and took a defensive position during our discussions, it almost sounded like someone was trying to scam us out of something, although I didn’t know what that would have been either. I gave them the opportunity to talk and explain the purpose of the emails and the call in greater detail. It turns out they were looking for a very specific flavor terpene called Pinene. Apparently, there is something specific about the pine trees that grow in Greer that had interested the manufacturer and they wanted to come in and collect some data. It sounded like something out of the forestry class I took in High School, as we had spent time trekking through the woods collecting moss and fungus samples.

We opened our doors to them and allowed them to come to stay the weekend at the farm. There is a guest house in the back of the property where we allow guests and clients to stay on occasion and it happened to be available the weekend they wanted to come out.

beautiful Greer arizona

Pinene terpenes are currently a very common form of an organic terpene and can be found in many things besides pine needles like cannabis, basil, dill, rosemary, and parsley. Many that are in the marijuana business use terpenes in their edibles and CBD products. When THC and CBD are extracted from the cannabis plant it loses many of its flavor profiles, and reintroducing terpenes into edible products enhances the flavor of the products.

What they were looking for on the farm was a very unique flavor profile from a type of pine tree found in Northern Arizona. Every climate produces natural plant life that differs from state to state. The pine tree in Washington state is very different from the pine trees found in Arizona. The specific type of pine apparently is a hybrid of the Ponderosa Pine and the Englemann Spruce. I’m not sure what the science behind that is, or if it has naturally absorbed flavor profiles from the spruce after hundreds of years growing amongst each other, whatever the case, it’s interesting and a change of pace from the horse wrangling we’re used to doing on these properties.

It was interesting enough that I thought I would share it with those of you still on our email list and receive periodic updates about our projects. As always, thank you for the support, we look forward to seeing most of you at our annual holiday event his year.